GRIPS EMERGING PLASTIC POLICIES 2021

 

BIODEGRADABILITY - CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT - FUGITIVE PLASTIC - KEYNOTE SPEAKERS - MICROFIBRES - MITIGATION IMPLICATIONS - POLICIES

 

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GETTING A GRIP ON PLASTIC - Is a conference on plastic research and innovation.

 

 

 

Global Research and Innovation in Plastics Sustainability (GRIPS) is a conference, exhibition and showcase held on 16th 18th March 2021 online. GRIPS is a virtual event for all those involved in the sustainability of polymers, plastics and elastomers.

 

In relation to the 7Seven Point Plastic Plan proposed in March of 2021 by the Cleaner Ocean Foundation's policy advisers, research into alternative methods of packaging and filming is essential for the Seven Articles to work effectively. Hence, the Foundation wholeheartedly supports such intervention by the Knowledge Transfer and UK Circular Plastics Network. The hope is that supermarkets may have the means to transform their thinking, along with drinks companies and appliance manufacturers.

 

Please find a useful link for delegates to view, shared by the session chair, Cressida Bowyer:

 

https://www.port.ac.uk/research/themes/sustainability-and-the-environment/revolution-plastics

 

 

Shahriar Hossain, Steve Fletcher, Adrian Whyle, Cressida Bowyer

 


Emerging Global Agreements Affecting Plastics - Wednesday, March 17, 10:15 AM-11:15 AM GMT

Presentations & Speaker Q&A


Steve Fletcher - Director of Revolution Plastics, UN International Resource Panel and University of Portsmouth

I lead the University of Portsmouth's Revolution Plastics programme which draws together plastics-focused research from across the entire university. I have personal expertise in plastics policy analysis and I have recently worked with the World Bank, G20 and UN on plastics policy advice. I am the ocean lead of the UN International Resource Panel.

 

 

 

SPEAKERS


Mark Miodo

Steve Fletcher

Cressida Bowyer (Chair)

Sian Sutherland

Shahriar Hossain

 

We attended this event, noting a number of speakers who were not listed, but we have included, where we caught their names. If you are not included and wish to be added, we'd be pleased to include.

 

The speakers were thinking along the same lines, with different slants applied. We were very impressed with the experts on policy, summing up by saying that the industry should not sit on the fence while they wait five to ten years for policy to be put in place, hopefully binding the Parties to action.

 

It was felt that we needed political commitment that was legally enforceable and nothing less. That the people's voice would be important in encouraging politicians to make this happen. And that policy should be bottom up, rather than top down.

 

We should learn from Covid-19 that things can be accomplished in relatively short order when it really matters. The shocker is that plastic waste does not seem to command that same sense of urgency, and neither does global warming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q&A - Upcoming questions - Sorted by vote 17 March

 


Q. Ms Sutherland: As a commercial consultant on plastics doesn't your Plastic Free conference & 'organisation deny benefits to developing countries? shouldn't you focus more on the circular economy / zero waste in LMECs? (Mr Hossain priorities 2,& 3)

 

Q. Fantastic panel. How do you combat the problem with moving from plastic packaging which has a smaller carbon footprint to produce and is easier to recycle than other materials such as paper or cardboard, particularly in food applications?

 

Q. Our 7Seven PP suggests ways to help remove micro fibres from rivers at source, with filters on domestic machines to remove plastic fibres that are normally flushed down the drain - similar to filters on tumble dryers (only wet). Could this help?

Q. For Sian Sutherland. Would
plastic offset trading be an idea to help discourage single use, along the lines of that used for carbon credits - suitably crafted so as not to tax necessary societal plastics?

Q Sian. When quoting GG emissions from plastic manufacture are we in danger of double counting? We use the reduction of GHG when producing biofuels which includes the extraction and refining of crude oil. So do you. Stats are dire but needs accuracy. Martin Kingsley

 

 

 

 

 

Q. Does Life Cycle Assessment fail to encompass all of plastics negatives (a lack of ecological damage from polluted plastic represented within impact categories)?

Q: circularity is important, how do you account for materials currently being used that contain harmful or hazardous chemicals that could threaten the current value stream of material? Morgan Condon

Q. 90% of ocean plastic flows from just 10 rivers, all in Asia. Lack of recycling and waste management infrastructure together with consumer behaviour are a large part of the cause. Do we risk demonising plastics that help reduce the problem ?

Q. Thank you for your presentation! In the UK, the ban on plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds got delayed due to coronavirus outbreak last year. My question to you, how is the Covid-19 pandemic impacted global agreements affecting plastic?

Q: In terms of a global agreement on plastics, what do the experts see as necessary in terms of legally binding measures and where does source reduction fit in?

Q Sian. When quoting GG emissions from plastic manufacture are we in danger of double counting? We use the reduction of GHG when producing biofuels which includes the extraction and refining of crude oil. So do you. Stats are dire but needs accuracy.
Martin Kingsley

Q: circularity is important, how do you account for materials currently being used that contain harmful or hazardous chemicals that could threaten the current value stream of material?  Morgan Condon

Q. 90% of ocean plastic flows from just 10 rivers, all in Asia. Lack of recycling and waste management infrastructure together with consumer behaviour are a large part of the cause. Do we risk demonising plastics that help reduce food waste?

Q. Hi Sian, I am a lecturer in the school of Mechanical & Design Engineering TU Dublin, I am interested in getting involved in the solution to reducing the volume of plastic waste & the life cycle of this material. How do I go about getting involved?

Q. It's fantastic that the industry are supporting a global framework. Would be interested to understand what upstream measures the industry sees as most important?
Christina Dixon

Q. It seems a pity that the insightful commentary from Mr Whyle was cut short, following more lengthy and somewhat down beat presentations. Is there scope for another forum to permit more profound debate around this most challenging of issues?  Terry McCormack

Q. Question: I am from Aruba. I have co-designed 3 policies to prohibit SUPs (including fossil-/plant- SUPs) on 2 islands, and 2 scientific studies toward policy design. How can SIDS be considered in global policy, supply-chains and packaging designs?

 

Q. Jana Busch - Thank you for your presentation! In the UK, the ban on plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds got delayed due to coronavirus outbreak last year. My question to you, how is the Covid-19 pandemic impacted global agreements affecting plastic?

 

Q. Katherine Ellsworth-Krebs - Question: What role do the panelists think big data and being able to track plastic flows (between countries, businesses, customers) play in any global agreement or action?

 

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SPONSORS

 

 

        

 

 

      

 

       

 

 

EXHIBITORS

 

 

           

 

              

 

 

 

CONTACTS

 

Aileen Woodley | Events Manager, KTN
aileen.woodley@ktn-uk.org

 

 

 

 

OCEAN CLEANUP PROJECTS A - Z

 

* Adidas

* Algalita research foundation

* Aliance to end Plastic Waste AEPW

* Baltimore Mr Trash river cleaning barge

* Boyan Slat's ocean booms

* CLAIM H2020 EU marine plastic project

* Earth Day - Fact sheet ocean plastic

* Fionn Ferreira's ferrofluid extraction of microplastics

* FlashLight Press Michelle Lord & Julia Blatt

* Greenpeace

* GRIPS - Global Research & Innovation in Plastics Sustainability

* 5 Gyres Institute

* Interceptor tethered river cleaning barges

* Junk Raft - plastic awareness voyage

* Kulo Luna graphic novel

* Miss Ocean - Plastic Awareness Events

* 4Ocean recycled plastic bracelets

* Nike - Sneakers from recycled materials, ocean spills

* Ocean Voyages Institute

* Ocean Waste Plastic

* Parley AIR

* Plastic Free Eastbourne

* Plastic Oceans Canada

* Plastic Oceans Chile

* Plastic Oceans Mexico

* Plastic Oceans Org

* Plastic Oceans UK

* Recycling Technologies

* Rozalia Project

* Seabin

* Sea Litter Critters

* SeaVax autonomous drones

* Surfers Against Sewage

* Surrey University PIRATE & Triton

* World Oceans Day

 

 

 

 

CAMPAIGN FOR ZERO WASTE - Supermarkets and oil companies have a lot to answer for. Politicians must explain why they let the retailers and fossil fuel industry get away with a practice they know to be harmful to marine life. Companies are largely driven by money and greed, their shareholders often kept in the dark. All the while millions of seabirds are dying, polar bears are playing with plastic and even shellfish have become inedible in some locations. This is morally unsound!

 

The River Thames is one of the filthiest rivers in the world in terms of microplastics and fibers. Yet nobody from the UK Government has made contact with the Foundation in over four years - even to test the water - nor Bluebird Marine in the two preceding years 2015-16. It speaks for itself that they must be happy as pigs in ---t!

 

 

 

GRIPS are not alone in the fight against ocean plastic. These emerging technologies could all play a part in containing the mountain of plastic that is accumulating on the oceans floors, by recovering floating debris before it sinks. New ideas are welcomed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LINKS & REFERENCE

 

https://

 

 

 

GLOBAL RESEARCH & INNOVATION IN PLASTICS SUSTAINABILITY -  

BIODEGRADABILITY - CAPTURING FUGITIVE PLASTIC - EMERGING POLICIES - KEYNOTE SPEAKERS - MICROFIBRES - MITIGATION IMPLICATIONS

               

 

 

 

ABS - BIOMAGNIFICATION - CANCER - CARRIER BAGS - COTTON BUDS - DDT - FISHING NETS - HEAVY METALS - MARINE LITTER - MICROBEADS

MICRO PLASTICS - NYLON - OCEAN GYRES - OCEAN WASTE -  PACKAGING - PCBS - PET - PETROLEUM - PLASTIC - PLASTICS -  POLYCARBONATE

POLYOLEFINS - POLYPROPYLENE - POLYSTYRENE - POLYTHENE - POPS PVC - SHOES - SINGLE USE - SOUP - STRAWS - WATER

 

 

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GLOBAL INNOVATION AND RESEARCH INTO PLASTIC SUSTAINABILITY BIODEGRADABILITY COMPOSTABLES